Friday, November 25, 2011

words deleted from the dust jacket of Sybil Exposed

permission given to post this:

"The original letter from Helen Vogel, executor of Flora Schreiber's will, giving access to Dr. Patrick Suraci to all of Schreiber's archives, dated Sept. 5, 1998, is in the Special Collections Library at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. The archive was made public shortly after that. Simon & Schuster has agreed to delete from the dust jacket in future editions of the book "Sybil Exposed" the words "first person'" in the sentence: "The Sybil archive became available to the public only recently, and Nathan is the first person to have examined all of it...."

Sunday, November 20, 2011

SYBIL in her own words: The Untold Story of Shirley Mason - now available at Amazon

SYBIL in her own words: The Untold Story of Shirley Mason, Her Multiple Personalities and Paintings [Kindle Edition]
Patrick Suraci Ph.D. (Author)

SYBIL in her own words: The Untold Story of Shirley Mason, Her Multiple Personalities and Paintings (Volume 1) [Paperback]
Patrick Suraci Ph.D. (Author) 

Sunday, November 13, 2011

Review of "Sybil in her own words"

Permission was given to post this here.

The book "Sybil in her own words" by Patrick Suraci, Ph.D. is for sale at

After reading the book "Sybil in her own words" by Patrick Suraci, Ph.D., I realized the importance of this book. The people in the Sybil story are treated like human beings and they are allowed to speak about their own life stories. What is interesting about this book, is that it is written by a professional who has experience with the scientific knowledge of MPD.

The book shows how Dr. Connie Wilbur's treatment was successful and that Shirley Mason (Sybil) never had a relapse or return of her MPD symptoms after her treatment with Wilbur. She was able to live a full life, as shown in her interactions and discussions with Patrick Suraci, Ph.D. 

In chapter seven, Dr. Suraci goes back to Shirley Mason's home town to check on her story and validate it. He speaks with three women, Wilma Bode, Betty Christen and Patricia Alcott, who were classmates and playmates with Shirley in her childhood. Wilma and Betty were two of the few children that were able to enter Shirley's household.

Wilma stated, "We always said that her mother was an old witch." She describes Shirley as having troubles concentrating in school and not knowing if she was day dreaming or that her attention was drawn away. Wilma is asked if she believes if Shirley was abused. Wilma states that she believes that some of what is written in the book did happen.

Betty talks about Shirley's mother. She states that her mother never came over to visit, but would come over and look (or peek) in the windows when they had company. She said that "Ms. Mason relieved herself in a neighbor's yard." 

Patricia describes Shirley's mother as "strange, stern, raucous" and "someone to stay away from."  She states that Shirley's mother (Mattie) "had a shrill voice and ridiculed Shirley." Shirley's mother repeated things over and over again. Patricia stated Mattie "played the piano too loudly, bombastically, venting anger. She was harsh."  She said that Shirley's father (Wilbur) "stood in shaded corners with his head down."

Patrick Suraci describes the mechanism of "splitting" that contributed to the development of Shirley's personalities. Shirley came to view Mattie sometimes as the "good mother" and sometimes as the "bad mother." 

In his chapter on Shirley in New York, Patrick Suraci speaks with Jim and Naomi, Shirley's closest living relatives. Jim had noticed that on the phone Shirley "was a different personality, a different person."  Naomi agreed and described a strong change in personality also. Naomi in Chapter Nine tells Patrick that Shirley and Dr. Wilbur confirmed that the book Sybil "was 100% accurate."

The pictures in the book are excellent. Under one of the pictures drawn by Shirley's alter Peggy of a Christmas tree (in black and white), the note describes that Christmas was unpleasant for Shirley because she would receive a lot of games and toys which her mother would put away and not let her play with. Shirley was told she could play with them another time. Yet her mother would give them away to a poor family that didn't have anything.

Patrick Suraci states in his chapter Controversy Over Sybil that Mason, Schreiber and Wilbur were offered money, television and media interviews to reveal Shirley's identity, but did not do this. He discusses the problems with Dr. Herbert Spiegel's view of the Sybil story, as well as other skeptical of the story.

I highly recommend this book to those interested in the Sybil story. It is very well documented, using actual transcripts of conversations with those in the story and those that knew Shirley, showing that the original Sybil book was an accurate description of Shirley's life.

Saturday, November 5, 2011

information from person that has MPD/DID

posted with permission

I have MPD/DID and was diagnosed by one of the most famous physicians, and treated by one of the most famous psychologists, but I got physically ill and had to stop treatment. This was back in the late 90's. Since then, my memories have come back on MY OWN, without a psychologist. No, I do not have a B12 deficiency because I was tested at a muscular dystrophy clinic for Pernicious anemia.

My memories of horrific abuse and torture have been helpful to the district attorney's office in Philadelphia, and I am not the only one reporting this abuse. I have had several district attorneys to my home to interview me. I don't think they would waste their time with numerous interviews if I was delusional.

I have never been integrated, I am still a multiple.  This abuse and torture of a child is a gift that keeps on giving........This horrific abuse has to stop. I wonder who finances these people? I have my guesses.

I have nothing to gain financially from this, are the false memory people able to say the same? I never wrote a book, there will be no movie, but I know I am helping the Philadelphia DA's with my memories of abuse and torture.

I will die a poor women, but I have my dignity, and I know the circumstances surrounding my life. That was important to me, to know what, where and why this happened. This was my one and only goal. And to know that I have helped for the greater good, and have been a voice for so many.


Judith Weiss Collins

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

from Sybil's closest living relative

posted by permission from Naomi Rhode

As Shirley Mason's (Sybil) closest living relative, I was close to her for the 30 plus years through the saga of her life journey. In fact, I was with her for several days during the week of her death, at her request, and was one of the only people that was in constant contact with her over those 30 years. I kept her identity confidential at her fervent request. Through all these years up until literally the day before she died, she verified the complete accuracy of the book, 'Sybil'. Debbie Nathan claims that she contacted me for an interview in 2008 and that I declined. Over the years many people have contacted me for information about Shirley's life. Not knowing their intent, always, I have declined all such interviews. If Debbie was one of those people, I do not recall the call, as I do not keep records of every call in a busy business life. I apologize for this, but I do not recall her calling. Knowing Dr. Connie Wilbur, and Flora Schreiber, also, the book concerns me greatly. It is an attack on their credibility, their research, and their professionalism. And, the book is a complete attack on the person I loved, Shirley Mason.

Shirley did not die a recluse. Shirley was a loving, and productive woman until her final,lengthy bout with cancer. She painted, and taught painting. She sold her paintings. She corresponded with friends, and regularly with us. She was a woman of strong spiritual faith in God, loved her books and her music, and loved our family greatly. She chose, however, to live carefully and confidentially because she was adamant that her identity not be known. She was very protective of our family and any recourse her life and story may have on us.